NEWS

A Quote remembered. Marcus Walker President AFGE L1206

First they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a socialist.

Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a trade unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

RAISE OR NO RAISE Let the powers know your thoughts

IMPORTANT: This information should not be downloaded using government equipment, read during duty time or sent to others using government equipment, because it suggests action to be taken in support or against legislation. Do not use your government email address or government phone in contacting your lawmakers.

Please take 5 minutes to call your representative and both senators at 1-888-907-8362 today to urge them to support the 1.9% pay adjustment for federal workers in FY2019 and oppose any efforts to freeze our pay.

The 1.9% pay adjustment for federal workers is a step forward for working families. It would help us catch up to our private sector counterparts after years of pay freezes and shutdowns. We provide vital services to our communities and our country every day – we cannot afford another pay freeze.

Right now, the Senate has the pay adjustment included as part of its Financial Services Appropriations bill. The House version does not include this. That’s why we must call as soon as possible to make sure both versions include the catch-up pay that we have earned.

Please make sure you call 1-888-907-8362 three times.

The first time you call, please speak with your representative. After you’ve told your representative to support a pay adjustment and oppose a pay freeze, hang up, and call the number two more times to tell your senators the same.

OPM sends out MEMO

MEMORANDUM FOR:  HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES

From: JEFF T.H. PON, DIRECTOR

Subject:

Updated Guidance Relating to Enjoinment of Certain Provisions of Executive Orders 13836, 13837, and 13839

On August 24, 2018, U.S. District Court Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson issued an Order enjoining certain provisions of Executive Orders 13836, 13837, and 13839 (see Order at https://ecf.dcd.uscourts.gov/cgi-bin/show_public_doc?2018cv1261-58). Specifically, Judge Jackson’s Order enjoined the President’s subordinates from implementing or giving effect to: Executive Order 13836 §§ 5(a), 5(e), 6; Executive Order 13837 §§ 3(a), 4(a), 4(b); and Executive Order 13839 §§ 3, 4(a), 4(c).  All other provisions of the Executive Orders not enjoined remain in effect.

The U.S. Office of Personnel Management’s (OPM) guidance of July 5, 2018, that was circulated pursuant to issuance of Executive Orders 13836, 13837, and 13839 and that relates to provisions of the Orders that were enjoined should be considered rescinded. OPM guidance relating to the still effective provisions remains in place.

OPM will fully comply with Judge Jackson’s Order and encourages other agencies to consult with their offices of human resources and general counsel to determine proper compliance measures based on the Order. OPM will work with the U.S. Department of Justice to evaluate next steps in this litigation and will provide additional guidance to agencies as appropriate.

cc:  Chief Human Capital Officers (CHCOs), Deputy CHCOs, and Human Resources Directors

Huge Win for Our Union! Court Strikes Down Anti-Worker Executive Order

In a landmark decision, a federal judge has ruled that President Trump violated the U.S. Constitution and laws providing checks and balances in the federal government by attempting to deny more than 2 million federal workers their legal right to representation.

Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled late Friday that the Trump administration’s May 25 executive order on official time violated the U.S. Constitution and the separation of powers as established in law.

AFGE, which was the first union to challenge President Trump’s executive orders in court, applauded the judge’s ruling.

“President Trump’s illegal action was a direct assault on the legal rights and protections that Congress specifically guaranteed to the public-sector employees across this country who keep our federal government running every single day,” AFGE President J. David Cox Sr. said.

“We are heartened by the judge’s ruling and by the huge outpouring of support shown to federal workers by lawmakers from both parties, fellow union workers, and compassionate citizens across the country,” Cox added. “Our members go to work every single day to serve the American people, and they deserve all the rights and protections afforded to them by our founding fathers.”

The lawsuits

AFGE, the largest union representing federal government employees, filed two lawsuits challenging President Trump’s executive orders.

The first lawsuit challenged the executive order on official time as a violation of the right to freedom of association guaranteed by the First Amendment, and as exceeding the president’s authority. The second lawsuit charged that the remaining two orders exceed the president’s authority under the U.S. Constitution by violating the separation of powers and exceeding current law.

The impact of these executive orders began being felt months before they were even issued, as the Department of Education in March threw out the contract covering 3,900 federal employees represented by AFGE and implemented its own illegal management edict that strips workers of their union rights, a precursor to what was to come weeks later when President Trump issued the three union-busting, anti-federal worker executive orders.

Since the executive orders were signed May 25, other agencies including the Social Security Administration and Department of Veterans Affairs have issued similar edicts in an attempt to eradicate unions from the federal workplace and deny workers their legal right to representation.

“Now that the judge has issued her decision, I urge all agencies that have attempted to enforce this illegal executive order to restore all previously negotiated contracts and to bargain in good faith with employee representatives on any future changes as required under the law,” Cox said.

Democracy Wins as Court Strikes Down Trump’s Anti-Worker Executive Order

jDavidAFGE applauds ruling that administration illegally gutted workers’ rights, violated labor contracts

WASHINGTON – In a landmark decision, a federal judge has ruled that President Trump violated the U.S. Constitution and laws providing checks and balances in the federal government by attempting to deny more than 2 million federal workers their legal right to representation.

Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled late friday that the Trump administration’s May 25 executive order on official time violated the 1st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the separation of powers as established in law.

The American Federation of Government Employees, which was the first union to challenge President Trump’s executive orders in court, applauded the judge’s ruling.

“President Trump’s illegal action was a direct assault on the legal rights and protections that Congress specifically guaranteed to the public-sector employees across this country who keep our federal government running every single day,” AFGE National President J. David Cox Sr. said.

“We are heartened by the judge’s ruling and by the huge outpouring of support shown to federal workers by lawmakers from both parties, fellow union workers, and compassionate citizens across the country,” Cox said. “Our members go to work every single day to serve the American people, and they deserve all the rights and protections afforded to them by our founding fathers.”

AFGE, the largest union representing federal government employees, filed two lawsuits challenging President Trump’s executive orders. The first lawsuit challenged the executive order on official time as a violation of the right to freedom of association guaranteed by the First Amendment, and as exceeding the president’s authority. The second lawsuit charged that the remaining two orders exceed the president’s authority under the U.S. Constitution by violating the separation of powers and exceeding current law.

The impact of these executive orders began being felt months before they were even issued, as the Department of Education in March threw out the contract covering 3,900 federal employees represented by AFGE and implemented its own illegal management edict that strips workers of their union rights, a precursor to what was to come weeks later when President Trump issued the three union-busting, anti-federal worker executive orders. Since the executive orders were signed May 25, other agencies including the Social Security Administration and Department of Veterans Affairs have issued similar edicts in an attempt to eradicate unions from the federal workplace and deny workers their legal right to representation.

“Now that the judge has issued her decision, I urge all agencies that have attempted to enforce this illegal executive order to restore all previously negotiated contracts and to bargain in good faith with employee representatives on any future changes as required under the law,” Cox said.

J. David Cox Sr., Everett Kelley, Jeremy Lannan Elected National Officers

AFGE leaders 2018

Our members came together at the union’s 41st National Convention to elect our top three national officers.

National President J. David Cox Sr. returns to office for another three-year term. District 5 National Vice President Everett Kelley has been elected National Secretary-Treasurer, and Jeremy Lannan has been elected National Vice President for Women and Fair Practices – both for three-year terms as well.

Cox was first elected National President in 2012, while Kelley and Lannan have been elected to national office for the first time.

“I’m honored to be chosen as our leader – and I’m excited for us to prevail,” said Cox. “I’m ready to put it all on the line and lead our members to victory in every fight and against every challenge. This is about being the biggest, strongest, most organized, and engaged union there is, and I’m not going to stop until we reach that goal. We see the fight ahead. We will take those challenges head on, and as one union we will prevail!”